Foliphos- How should it be used?

The provision of Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin), folic acid and butaphosphan (organic phosphorus) is pivotal to the needs of the exercising horse. Most importantly, the various roles in red blood cell synthesis and energy production/utilisation. (more…)

Key Steps to Optimal Recovery

Optimal recovery post exercise or racing enables your horses to continue to train and perform at peak levels. Poor recovery from racing or exercise can lead to horses ‘training off’, injury, sub-optimal racing performance and may affect future racing longevity. Strenuous exercise affects many areas of body function; muscle function & damage, blood acid base balance, fluid & electrolyte loss and energy storage.  Ensuring adequate nutrition enables the replenishment, repair and recovery of all these processes is critical to overall well being and optimal performance of your horse. (more…)

Potassium Plus

Abstract Potassium is a key electrolyte important for maintaining tissue osmotic pressure and acid base equilibrium, and playing a key role in nerve function and muscle contraction.  Potassium is found within all cells and its levels are primarily controlled by the kidneys.  Potassium losses can cause dramatic drop in race performance and may lead to premature muscle fatigue and mental irritability.  Blood Potassium levels below 3.5mmol/L can affect the ability of your horse to win. Potassium PLUS Potassium is a key electrolyte important for maintaining tissue osmotic pressure and acid base equilibrium, and playing a key role in nerve function

Blood pH

Abstract  The blood of the racehorse has a very delicate acid and base balance.  Following exercise muscle cells and blood become acidic (an excess of H+ ions) particularly during sprint work or maximum exertion.  Optimum performance demands that this balance be maintained within the critical limit of 7.42-7.45. A blood pH below 7.40 indicates acidosis or lowered alkali reserve causing muscle fatigue, mental irritability, poor performance and muscle soreness. Blood pH The blood of the racehorse has a very delicate acid and base balance.  Following exercise muscle cells and blood become acidic (an excess of H+ ions) particularly during sprint